E-mail Interview with Jesse Dimick, PTA, LATC


jesse1

The man. The Myth. The legend?

Jesse Dimick is a dual certified physical therapist assistant and licensed athletic trainer in the Boston, MA area. Jesse currently works in an orthopedic outpatient physical therapy clinic, but also is the athletic trainer for the boys’ and girls’ hockey teams at Wellesley High School in Wellesley, MA.

Jesse’s dual certification has allowed him to gain extensive knowledge and experience in the diagnosis of acute injuries, along with progression of those injuries through a comprehensive physical therapy regimen, and ultimately back onto the field.

MS: First, why did you get into athletic training?

JD: My love for sports and science were my main reasons for choosing athletic training.  My interest was further sparked when I had a scope on my knee in high school.  I received some PT after and became intrigued with the job.  So my junior and senior year in high school I did a lot of job shadowing. 

MS: What is your favorite part of your job?

JD: Being part of the acute intervention.  I am with the athlete seconds after an injury occurs.  Seeing the mechanism of injury makes diagnosing and treatment a lot easier.  Also, there is no greater feeling than seeing an athlete step back in the field for the first time after suffering an injury.

MS: Do you have a preference of working in the clinic or on the field?

JD: I enjoy one as much as the other.  Field work can be boring at times, as there can be a lot of down time if no injuries occur.  Progressing and developing rehab programs is one of the great parts of working in the clinic.  I’m always looking for new and advanced rehab protocols to help my athletes recover faster and prevent further injury.

MS: Why do you think it is beneficial to have a licensed athletic trainer working in a physical therapy clinic?

JD: In an orthopedic outpatient PT practice, athletic trainers can bring a wealth of knowledge to the table for patients and other practitioners.  There is way more to being a LAT than being able to tape an ankle.  We poses evaluation and treatment skills for all orthopedic injuries.  We also have an in-depth insight to mechanisms of injury.  We are often on the field to witness injuries as they occur which helps us implement acute intervention safely and effectively.  Acute intervention with injuries provides a seamless transition in recovery.  Knowing common injury mechanisms allows us to instruct patients in proper techniques or exercises to safely return to their sport, job, or hobby without risk of re-injuring.  This knowledge combined with a PT’s evaluation skills and treatment plans can provide patient care unmatched by a single health care provider.   

MS: Which diagnosis or body part is your favorite to treat?

JD: I tend to like any lower extremity injury.  Our lower extremity is the power center for all sports.  Agility, power, strength,endurance and flexibility of the lower body require constant tuning to stay healthy and at the top of our game.  Knee, ankle or hip injuries allow for me to incorporate a ton of sport specific training techniques, which tend to be more involved and exciting to implement than bicep curls or rotator cuff strengthening.  

MS: What is your dream job?

JD: I’m doing it.

To contact Jesse Dimick:

Email: Jdimick@sportsandpt.com

Twitter:@jdimick

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2 responses to “E-mail Interview with Jesse Dimick, PTA, LATC

  1. Thanks Mike,
    Jesse does an amazing job working the sidelines and rinks, and getting those athletes into our clinics as soon as possible with the knowledge of mechanism of injury, and what was done at the time of injury. There is a small rift between PTs and ATCs that we all need to see beyond, and see how we can all work together to get athletes back on the field as fast as possible.

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